How serious is 20-25 HPF in pus cells?

Posted by Amelia on December 16, 2022
Table of Contents

    Introduction

    The presence of pus cells in your urine is a sign that there's an infection in your urinary tract. Pus is white blood cells, dead bacteria and other immune system cells. When you see pus in the toilet bowl or on a dipstick test, it means that there's bacteria present in your urine and that you may have an UTI (urinary tract infection). Over time, having too many white blood cells or pus cells can damage your kidneys. But before we get into all that, let's talk about what causes elevated levels of these two things in the first place:

    What is pus cells in urine?

    Pus cells are white blood cells that have leaked from the blood vessels into the urine. They can be seen in kidney infections, bladder infections and UTIs (urinary tract infections).

    Pus cells are usually associated with a higher protein content in the urine. A pus cell count of 1000/HPF is considered abnormal.

    How to interpret white blood cells/ pus cells in urine?

    To begin, let's go over the normal range of pus cells in urine:

    • A healthy person should have no more than 2 white blood cells per high power field (HPF) with a microscope.
    • The average person has 5-10 white blood cells per HPF.

    So, what is your risk of having an elevated white blood cell count or presence of pus cells in your urine?

    The causes of elevated white blood cells or pus cells in urine can vary depending on many factors such as age, gender and race as well as underlying medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis among others.

    What is the normal range of pus cells in urine?

    If you see pus cells in your urine sample, it can be a sign of an infection. Pus cells are white blood cells that have stopped functioning properly and are not able to fight off infections as they normally would. They are usually seen when there is an infection in your body.

    The normal range of pus cells in urine is between 0 and 3 cells per milliliter (ml). If you see more than 3 pus cells per ml in your urine sample, this could mean that you have an infection somewhere in your urinary tract or kidneys. If this happens, it's important for you to speak with a doctor about how to treat it because untreated infections can spread throughout the body and make other parts of the body very sick as well.

    What are the causes of elevated white blood cells or pus cells in urine?

    There are a number of different causes for elevated white blood cells or pus cells in urine. These include:

    • Infection in the urinary tract
    • Inflammation of the urinary tract
    • Bacterial infection, such as a UTI (urinary tract infection), kidney infection, bladder infection and prostatitis.

    Are you at risk for an elevated white blood cell count or presence of pus cells in your urine?

    You can be at risk for an elevated white blood cell count or presence of pus cells in your urine if you:

    • are pregnant
    • have had a kidney stone
    • have a urinary tract infection (UTI) or other type of infection, such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, or sepsis. If you have any kind of infection that affects the urinary tract, it may cause pus to form inside the bladder and potentially show up in your urine. It's possible that this could happen even if you're not aware of having an active UTI or other disease.
    • have had surgery on your kidneys or ureter (the tube that takes urine from each kidney to the bladder). Your doctor may tell you not to use tampons during this time period because they can cause an infection if inserted into areas where there is still bleeding from surgery sites. You should follow their instructions closely until your doctor gives permission for tampons again since there is always some risk with tampons during this time period due to increased risks for infections like UTIs and vaginitis; although these risks are small compared with overall frequency rates given how widespread tampon usage has become over recent decades!

    What diseases can occur due to high levels of white blood cell count or pus cell count in the urine?

    The White Blood Cell Count and Pus Cell Count can be affected by several diseases. Some of these include:

    • Bacterial infections
    • Urinary tract infection or UTI, which is an infection in your urinary system. A UTI can begin in your bladder but may spread to the kidneys, causing a kidney infection.
    • Kidney infection, which is also known as pyelonephritis. This type of infection is most common among women than men and occurs when bacteria enters the urinary tract through the urethra (the tube that carries urine from your body to outside) or through one of two tubes that connect each kidney with another part of your body -

    Doctors often treat high counts of WBCs and pus cells with antibiotics, though you should consult your doctor before starting a medication.

    Pus cells are white blood cells that have been activated by an infection. They are often a sign of infection, but they can also be caused by cancer or other conditions.

    The presence of pus cells in your urine is not normal and should be evaluated by a doctor. Pus cells may indicate a urinary tract infection (UTI), kidney disease, or some cancers such as leukemia or lymphoma.

    Conclusion

    We hope that this article has helped you to learn more about what white blood cell and pus cell counts mean in your urine, and how they can affect your health. If you are concerned about these values, we recommend that you see your doctor!

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