What does it mean to have occasional epithelial cells in urine?

Posted by Amelia on December 16, 2022
Table of Contents

    Introduction

    Epithelial cells are the cells that form the outer layer of your body. They are commonly found in urine, but occasionally finding them can be a sign of a more serious health problem.

    Some epithelial cells are normal.

    Despite the name, these cells are normal and the body sheds them in urine all the time. While some people may find them alarming or gross, it's completely normal for your urine to contain epithelial cells at any given time.

    The lining of our bodies is protected from bacteria and other harmful substances by this layer of epithelial cells lining our organs and cavities such as the mouth, throat, lungs and intestines. When these cells are sloughed off (shed), they pass through our urethra as we urinate onto toilet paper or into a toilet bowl where they can be examined under a microscope to determine their appearance.

    Epithelial cells that are sloughed off the bladder wall or urethra may indicate a urinary tract infection.

    Epithelial cells are the lining of the bladder, urethra and vagina. They are sloughed off in normal urine production, but can be found with a microscope if there is an infection in your urinary tract. Epithelial cells are usually associated with a urinary tract infection (UTI), which is common and usually treatable. If left untreated, UTIs can cause serious complications that may require surgery to correct them.

    Epithelial cells from the vagina or cervix may indicate an STD.

    Epithelial cells from the vagina or cervix may indicate an STD, such as bacterial vaginosis or trichomoniasis. They can also be a sign of cervical cancer, chlamydia or gonorrhea, pelvic inflammatory disease and other STDs.

    If you have occasional epithelial cells in your urine along with upper respiratory problems, fever and other symptoms, you should talk to your doctor about getting tested for STDs immediately because this could be an indication of chlamydia or gonorrhea.

    Epithelial cells from the prostate may indicate prostate cancer.

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men. Most prostate cancers are slow growing, but some grow more quickly and can spread to other parts of the body if not treated.

    Epithelial cells from the prostate may indicate that you have an aggressive form of prostate cancer, which may be harder to treat than other types of prostate tumor. In addition, having frequent blood in your urine may be an early sign of cancer in your bladder or kidneys (renal cell carcinoma).

    Blood in urine is usually caused by kidney disease, a urinary tract infection or tumor.

    It's important to note that red blood cells in urine can be a sign of other conditions, such as a bladder or kidney infection. However, it's also possible that your doctor will ask you to get more tests to find out if you have cancer of the bladder, kidney or prostate.

    If you're worried about red blood cells in your urine, talk with your doctor about ways to reduce the risk of developing cancer.

    White blood cells in urine usually indicate a bacterial infection in the urinary tract.

    White blood cells are the body's first line of defense against infection. If your urine contains white blood cells, it may be because you have a bacterial infection in your urinary tract. Other causes include kidney disease and cancer.

    If you have frequent drops of blood in your urine, or if you have pain when urinating, see your doctor as soon as possible to rule out any underlying problems that may require medical attention.

    Occasionally finding epithelial cells in urine is often normal, but can be a sign of a more serious health problem in some cases.

    Epithelial cells are the cells lining your urinary tract, including your bladder and urethra. They're shed every day when you urinate and can be found in your urine, but that doesn't necessarily mean anything is wrong.

    Occasionally finding epithelial cells in your urine is often normal, and it can be a sign of a more serious health problem in some cases. For example, if you have an infection or inflammation of the bladder or urinary tract such as interstitial cystitis (IC), then finding epithelial cells may be related to these conditions.

    Finding any epithelial cells in your urine while you're doing a standard urinalysis can be pretty confusing. What exactly does it mean?

    When you see epithelial cells in your urine, it's a sign of something going on inside your urinary tract. Epithelial cells are the thin, flat layers that form the lining of our organs and cavities. They're shed into the urine all the time, but finding them during a urinalysis can be an indicator that something is wrong.

    In general, if these cells are found in your pee when you do a standard urinalysis (commonly called a "UA"), it usually means one of two things: either you have an infection or there's some kind of obstruction somewhere along your urethra or bladder. Infections like UTIs (urinary tract infections) and kidney stones cause inflammation and irritation to those delicate tissues; this irritation causes premature shedding of epithelial cells into urine. The presence of these shed cells might also indicate inflammation or irritation from another disease process—like interstitial cystitis—that's affecting those same parts of your body...

    With the exception of squamous epithelial cells, epithelial cells are generally not something you want to find in your urine.

    Epithelial cells are the cells that line the inside of your body, and they're generally not something you want to find in your urine. However, there are some exceptions: Squamous epithelial cells are an important part of your urinary tract, as they help keep it healthy by protecting it from germs. If you do have squamous epithelial cells in your sample, this may mean that you have an infection (such as a UTI) or after surgery might be healing properly.

    Occasional epithelial cells may be indicative of urinary tract infections or trauma caused by kidney stones, among other causes.

    Epithelial cells are the cells that line the urinary tract and are normally shed from it. When found in urine, it is an indication that there is an infection or trauma within your urinary tract.

    Occasional epithelial cells may be indicative of urinary tract infections or trauma caused by kidney stones, among other causes.

    If you find epithelial cells in your urine, talk to a doctor or another health care provider about the diagnosis.

    While epithelial cells are usually present in urine, they can indicate a UTI.

    If you find epithelial cells in your urine, you should discuss this with your health care provider. Your health care provider will be able to give you more information about what it means if you have these cells in your urine and whether or not it might be a sign of an infection.

    "Occasional" epithelial cells mean that your overall results were good, but they may require further testing.

    The presence of epithelial cells in urine is not something that you want to see, generally. However, it does not always indicate a serious problem. Occasional epithelial cells may be indicative of urinary tract infections or trauma caused by kidney stones, among other causes.

    Most importantly, these results should prompt further testing and evaluation by your doctor to determine if there is indeed a health issue at hand and what steps to take moving forward.

    Conclusion

    While finding epithelial cells in your urine is not necessarily a cause for concern, it may be a sign of another condition that requires treatment. It’s important to pay attention to any changes in your body and seek medical attention if you notice something unusual.

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